Posts tagged ‘managers’

Q. How can I monitor interns to make sure they are succeeding at their internship?

by the Intern Coach

A.  Good question! You need to track your new interns’ activities and make sure the interns are performing their duties to company expectations—and school expectations, too, especially if they are earning academic credits. If you have more than one intern, it can be overwhelming for you to keep tabs on everyone. You may be the point of contact, but consider these ways to make your job easier: 

  • Discuss the company expectations with each intern on the first day. Then, you are both on the same page—literally. Provide a schedule and calendar for the entire internship period, so the intern knows the goals and the deadlines for each assignment.
  • Introduce the intern(s) to each department and present the intern work calendar to the department head. Then, the department head takes over, ensuring the intern meets everyone in the department, achieves a good comfort level, and understands the duties.
  • Request that the department head or the person in that department who is supervising the intern file a weekly report with you on the intern’s activities and accomplishments. Ask the intern to also file a report, stating what he/she has done that week.
  • Schedule a weekly 15-minute appointment with each intern to talk about the internship. If you have multiple interns, you could hold one meeting with all the interns, facilitating an exchange of information among the group and encouraging professional relationships.
  • Monitor your intern in case an internship experience is derailed and needs assistance getting back on track. Some signs of a problem might be an intern who is consistently late for work, calls in sick on a regular basis, or who spends too much time on their cell phone. In these situations, jump in early and work with the intern to improve the situation.

May 12, 2010 at 9:44 am Leave a comment

Internships: they’re not just for summer anymore

by Miguel Corona

There is no question that summer is the most popular period for internships. Students are able to take advantage of a three month break from school to apply their classroom knowledge in practical settings. Additionally, over that same period, employers are able to leverage a reliable source of skilled employees to accomplish short-term projects as well as shore up teams that might be understaffed due to summer vacation schedules. By and large, participating in a summer internship program is highly beneficial to students and employers. So why should employers only take advantage of these benefits in the summer? There is no reason why employers can’t continue building their professional employee pipeline other than in the summer months. Consider the following arrangements to implement an internship program on a year round basis.          

Break the Mold

When I managed the internship and cooperative education programs for the University of Texas at El Paso Career Center, there were often many reasons (e.g. financial, personal, career, etc.) students chose to extend their summer internships. While some colleges might not officially sponsor such arrangements, students might opt to continue working into the fall to meet certain personal obligations or needs. Furthermore, based on these same needs, many students might consider internship opportunities that make use of spring/summer combinations rather than the traditional summer schedule. In a nutshell, consider internships that might not fit the traditional internship “mold” – chances are good there are many students out there who will jump at the opportunity.

Flexibility in Quarter Systems

Both semester and quarter systems furnish college students approximately three months each summer for employment opportunities. However, quarter systems might offer employers additional choices when trying to implement an internship programs on a year round basis. Students attending colleges on quarter systems can provide more flexibility, particularly if projects well-suited for interns present themselves through out the year and not just the summer months. Quarter systems allow students to complete an internship in the middle of the year and still remain on track for graduation. Employers can even consider recruiting at schools using each system in order to meet their year round needs.

Part-Timers

Depending on the college, some internship programs allow students to work 10-20 hours per week during the academic year. These types of internship arrangements allow students to work and potentially earn college credit provided that a student’s work experience is directly related to their area of study. These scenarios are a great option for local employers or organizations that offer virtual opportunities. For employers, it provides yet another opportunity to maintain an internship program year round.

March 16, 2010 at 12:56 am Leave a comment


About this blog

This blog is dedicated to employers with a focus on how to hire and manage interns effectively. We will have a variety of experts who will share helpful ideas, tips and more. We invite you to comment, ask questions and share your experiences. You are also welcome to submit written contributions to this blog.

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